Flooding warning

Southend Standard: Ray Bailey, Peter Grubb and Peter Lovett, of the Friends of Shoebury Common Ray Bailey, Peter Grubb and Peter Lovett, of the Friends of Shoebury Common

CAMPAIGNERS fear the controversial seawall planned for Shoebury Common could cause flooding after a new study suggested it will be made of clay.

The seawall, designed to protect more than 350 homes and businesses in Shoebury from flooding, will be built with 44,000 tonnes of earth extracted from Southend cliffs and stored on Old Gunners Park.

Engineers told Southend Council the earth was granular, allowing rainwater to drain away, but a report by Exposem Site Investigations, commissioned by anti-seawall group the Friends of Shoebury Common, found the material was non-porous London clay.

The council, which took advice from two engineering firms, has insisted the material is granular and safe to use.

Andrew Lewis, the council’s corporate director for place, said: “In order to come to a view on the material used for the sea defence scheme, the council has taken detailed and comprehensive advice from two separate expert engineering companies, Buro Happold and Halcrow.

“The initial assessments by BH involved boring 35 holes into the cliffs, up to depths of 50 metres, for close inspection of the material and installation of measuring equipment.

This helped to inform the detailed ground investigations report which runs into hundreds of pages and includes detailed analysis and information.

“The material is currently stored in two piles, one of which is predominantly granular material and the second of which is clay.

“This segregation was part of the works carried out as part of the cliffs slip project. It is not surprising a small random survey sample would find pockets of clay in the larger pile and in the smaller pile which, as explained, is a pile of clay.

“It should also be said that claims of clay not being appropriate for sea defence are not accurate. For example, the embankments to the sea defence at Chalkwell are constructed from imported clay and do not create the type of problems FOSC suggests.”

More than 2,000 people have called for a public inquiry into the council’s handling of plans for a seawall in Shoebury.

The Friends of group have launched a petition calling on the Government to investigate why the authority agreed to build the 7ft wall on Shoebury Common despite huge public opposition.

The petition can be signed at Uncle Tom’s Cabin, on the common, or at http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/ petitions/ 64056

Comments (12)

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1:20pm Thu 29 May 14

sesibollox says...

CLAY OR CONCRETE, WOOD OR METAL, IT STOPPETH THE WATER
and please learn to spell, might give you a little more credibility, you know.
CLAY OR CONCRETE, WOOD OR METAL, IT STOPPETH THE WATER and please learn to spell, might give you a little more credibility, you know. sesibollox
  • Score: 0

1:51pm Thu 29 May 14

MistyEmperor says...

I've not much faith in their plight against the seawall if they write just four words, clearly add an 'S' at the last minute and then spell stitch wrong. It's a seawall, it will protect your houses, the experts know more than you, It's a fckup!
I've not much faith in their plight against the seawall if they write just four words, clearly add an 'S' at the last minute and then spell stitch wrong. It's a seawall, it will protect your houses, the experts know more than you, It's a fckup! MistyEmperor
  • Score: 2

4:46pm Thu 29 May 14

Howard Cháse says...

It's a stich up.


lmfao.
It's a stich up. lmfao. Howard Cháse
  • Score: 2

4:52pm Thu 29 May 14

Devils Advocate says...

Obviously an object lesson for everybody. Never mind the danger, watch that spelling! Trouble is they haven't yet invented a spell checker for planks of wood. Or, perhaps, just planks.
Obviously an object lesson for everybody. Never mind the danger, watch that spelling! Trouble is they haven't yet invented a spell checker for planks of wood. Or, perhaps, just planks. Devils Advocate
  • Score: 4

5:51pm Thu 29 May 14

Nebs says...

I thought it was the fact that water seeped into the clay on the cliffs that caused the slippage in the first place.
I thought it was the fact that water seeped into the clay on the cliffs that caused the slippage in the first place. Nebs
  • Score: -4

6:18pm Thu 29 May 14

abd123 says...

It looks like a scene from last of the summer wine. They couldn't even spell stitch. How can they expect people to take them seriously.
It looks like a scene from last of the summer wine. They couldn't even spell stitch. How can they expect people to take them seriously. abd123
  • Score: 4

9:59pm Thu 29 May 14

jayman says...

here is what's required for future sea defence... an eight foot high twelve foot deep 'graphine' seawall which encompasses the entire Essex archipelago and peninsular. Okay! perhaps graphine is a bit of a push as it cant be made in such quantity yet. clay wont last as long, but it still needs to cover the same area to be a credible and consistent plan. should cost a few billion. (it is at this point that politicians suddenly go off the idea)...
here is what's required for future sea defence... an eight foot high twelve foot deep 'graphine' seawall which encompasses the entire Essex archipelago and peninsular. Okay! perhaps graphine is a bit of a push as it cant be made in such quantity yet. clay wont last as long, but it still needs to cover the same area to be a credible and consistent plan. should cost a few billion. (it is at this point that politicians suddenly go off the idea)... jayman
  • Score: -4

11:23pm Thu 29 May 14

Living the La Vida Legra says...

Don't build it and let them flood! W@nke$!
Don't build it and let them flood! W@nke$! Living the La Vida Legra
  • Score: 4

6:36am Fri 30 May 14

rodgdodge says...

Clay. Anyone knows, that when it has dried out ( especially here in Southend, one of the driest parts of the country!), it cracks open. Then when it rains, the water will penetrate deeper! This is what happened to the cliffs.
Large areas of Thorpe Bay and Shoebury had a clay layer just below the surface ( left from the last ice-age).
This was removed to supply the ` local` Brick -making factories ( Star Lane ect) with material.
Now the sub-soil is largely just sand and gravel, with a layer of earth on top.
In Thorpe Bay ( Burgess Estate area), this is only 12 to 18 inches deep !
Clay. Anyone knows, that when it has dried out ( especially here in Southend, one of the driest parts of the country!), it cracks open. Then when it rains, the water will penetrate deeper! This is what happened to the cliffs. Large areas of Thorpe Bay and Shoebury had a clay layer just below the surface ( left from the last ice-age). This was removed to supply the ` local` Brick -making factories ( Star Lane ect) with material. Now the sub-soil is largely just sand and gravel, with a layer of earth on top. In Thorpe Bay ( Burgess Estate area), this is only 12 to 18 inches deep ! rodgdodge
  • Score: -1

5:12pm Fri 30 May 14

John Right says...

Old morons, go and do some charity work, if your bored, or your wives are sick of seeing your mugs.
Old morons, go and do some charity work, if your bored, or your wives are sick of seeing your mugs. John Right
  • Score: 1

8:10pm Fri 30 May 14

abd123 says...

If the clay on the Westcliff cliffs dried, cracked open and let the rain in deeper then how many millennia did it take.?
If the clay on the Westcliff cliffs dried, cracked open and let the rain in deeper then how many millennia did it take.? abd123
  • Score: 0

9:07pm Fri 30 May 14

jayman says...

abd123 wrote:
If the clay on the Westcliff cliffs dried, cracked open and let the rain in deeper then how many millennia did it take.?
it could be that they intend to use clay 'tiles' with the view of regular inspection and replacement. clay embankments have been in use as a sea defence in Essex for years on account of the fact that its (London clays) one of our only extractable, mineral resources we have in this area.
[quote][p][bold]abd123[/bold] wrote: If the clay on the Westcliff cliffs dried, cracked open and let the rain in deeper then how many millennia did it take.?[/p][/quote]it could be that they intend to use clay 'tiles' with the view of regular inspection and replacement. clay embankments have been in use as a sea defence in Essex for years on account of the fact that its (London clays) one of our only extractable, mineral resources we have in this area. jayman
  • Score: 0

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