Filmmaker planning documentary charting history of Canvey's King Canute pub

Southend Standard: Film project – Joe Mander with his friend Liam Heatherson outside the King Canute Film project – Joe Mander with his friend Liam Heatherson outside the King Canute

A YOUNG film-maker is hoping to chart the history of an iconic Canvey pub for a documentary.

JoeMander, a film and TV student at South Essex College, decided tomake a film about the King Canute, in Canvey Way, after he heard about its closure.

The pub, which was used as a base for the Armed Forces during the 1953 floods, closed its doors for good over the weekend.

It was revealed earlier this month it had been sold to an as yet unidentified developer.

Mr Mander said he was encouraged to take on the project by people’s reactions.

He said: “When we heard the King Canute was closing, we thought it would be a good idea to make a documentary on the history of the pub.

“But it was really the reaction from the public when the closure of the pub was announced that encouraged us to take on the project. It’s something people will like I think.”

Following the sale of the pub, residents came together to sign up to an online campaign in a bid to stop development on the site.

More than 500 people have so far put their name to the petition.

Mr Mander is hoping to get as many people as possible who have been connected to the pub to get involved with the project.

He has so far been hampered in his attempts to gain access to the King Canute to shoot footage inside.

He said: “It will be difficult to film inside the pub after its closure as we don’t know who the new owners are.

“But we would really like to speak with anyone who has been involved with the pub in the past, or anyone who knows about the history of the building.”

Keen Canvey historian Gary Foulger, 56, has welcomed the news the King Canute will have its story told.

He said: “We have lost so much of Canvey’s heritage.

“The island means a lot to me and when I heard about the King Canute closing I had mixed emotions. My family had a lot of happy memories there.

“I think it’s brilliant this film is being made to preserve the history of the King Canute.

“If I won the lottery, I would love to put it back to how I remember it when I was a kid.”

Mr Mander intends to put his finished documentary on YouTube, where everyone will be able to see it for free.

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