Southend is UK's house sale hotspot

Southend Standard: Rob Cooke, director of estate agent Hunt Roche, in Leigh Rob Cooke, director of estate agent Hunt Roche, in Leigh

THE property market in Southend is hotting up with house prices rising and homes taking just 18 days to sell.

House prices in Southend have risen by 1.6 per cent in the past year to £152,881 for an average home and are generally being sold within two and a half weeks – 26 days faster than last year, new figures show.

Southend topped a list of the fastest-selling homes in the country, with house buyers snapping up properties two weeks quicker than in London.

Rob Cooke, director of estate agents Hunt Roche, in Leigh, said: “At the moment, there is a shortage of properties and that’s pushing prices up.

“We sold one late yesterday and another two this morning.”

He said the Government’s Help to Buy equity loan scheme, under which it loans house buyers up to a fifth of the value of properties worth up to £600,000, is driving up demand.

Demand is highest for properties worth up to £250,000, the estate agent said.

A study by the Centre for Economics and Business Research into the speed with which homes are sold in 20 of the largest towns and cities in the country put Southend joint-top with Liverpool and above London, Birmingham, Manchester and Leeds.

John Willcock, head of Post Office Mortgages, which commissioned the research, said: “This year has been a real turning point in the UK housing market with annual house price growth currently 3.4 per cent, the highest level it has been since November 2010.

“But house price data alone often hides a broader picture of recovery. This encouraging fall in the time it now takes to sell a property in Southend, for example, where house price growth is currently below the national level at 1.6 per cent, shows that real confidence is returning to the housing market in the area.”

But the lively market is bad news for first-time buyers trying to get a foothold on the property ladder.

Mr Cooke said: “It’s all relative to a point. If you’re on the ladder already it’s good.

“For people trying to get on the ladder it’s getting tougher.”

Lesley Salter, Southend councillor responsible for housing and Southend’s representative on the Thames Gateway South East Housing Panel, said: “It seems as though the number of visits to see a house before signing is decreasing and the time is going down.”

Comments (19)

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9:38am Mon 25 Nov 13

jayman says...

Buy to let landlords are having a field day.. lots of London refugees who have escaped the Tory social cull out of London. This is pushing up prices artificially. These figures are just as worrying to an economist as they are to a social scientist.

without demographic data to support the economic claim, the above article makes some very hard reading to even the mildest of sceptics.

The echo have quoted an estate agent.... This yields about as much value as consulting the population of wormwood scrubs on government criminal justice policy...
Buy to let landlords are having a field day.. lots of London refugees who have escaped the Tory social cull out of London. This is pushing up prices artificially. These figures are just as worrying to an economist as they are to a social scientist. without demographic data to support the economic claim, the above article makes some very hard reading to even the mildest of sceptics. The echo have quoted an estate agent.... This yields about as much value as consulting the population of wormwood scrubs on government criminal justice policy... jayman

12:36pm Mon 25 Nov 13

Howard Cháse says...

Is it because all the houses have been devalued, allegedly, because some airplanes fly overhead near them?
Is it because all the houses have been devalued, allegedly, because some airplanes fly overhead near them? Howard Cháse

1:37pm Mon 25 Nov 13

emcee says...

We seem to be heading for a society where only the well-off can own homes and the working class can only do so if they are very, very lucky.
Time to bring in better rental regulation to protect good tenants and good landlords as we may be heading for a generation or two(maybe more) of a rental society.
I personally do not think there is anything wrong in home rental. The key thing being just that, a home, not just a roof over your head. New regulations must control rents (which should stamp out short term buy to let profiteers), protect long term tenants and ensure landlords maintain properties to a high standard. At the same time, landlords must be protected against tenants who do not pay rent and who mistreat the property.
This country could have a healthy and, dare I say it, attractive rental market if only it was regulated a lot better. In many parts of Europe renting thrives. Not because people cannot buy a home but because it is attractive to do so, both on the side of the tenant and of the landlord.
We seem to be heading for a society where only the well-off can own homes and the working class can only do so if they are very, very lucky. Time to bring in better rental regulation to protect good tenants and good landlords as we may be heading for a generation or two(maybe more) of a rental society. I personally do not think there is anything wrong in home rental. The key thing being just that, a home, not just a roof over your head. New regulations must control rents (which should stamp out short term buy to let profiteers), protect long term tenants and ensure landlords maintain properties to a high standard. At the same time, landlords must be protected against tenants who do not pay rent and who mistreat the property. This country could have a healthy and, dare I say it, attractive rental market if only it was regulated a lot better. In many parts of Europe renting thrives. Not because people cannot buy a home but because it is attractive to do so, both on the side of the tenant and of the landlord. emcee

1:58pm Mon 25 Nov 13

heartbeat says...

Knock-on effect from the Olympics I reckon, as people have just discovered there is life to be found east of London, not just to the west, and actually it compares favourably in a lot of ways (ie being near beaches and the Estuary). Prices in a lot of Essex areas are considerably lower than similar properties in other areas at the moment. Good for those on the property ladder but not for those trying to buy their first place.
Knock-on effect from the Olympics I reckon, as people have just discovered there is life to be found east of London, not just to the west, and actually it compares favourably in a lot of ways (ie being near beaches and the Estuary). Prices in a lot of Essex areas are considerably lower than similar properties in other areas at the moment. Good for those on the property ladder but not for those trying to buy their first place. heartbeat

2:37pm Mon 25 Nov 13

GrumpyofLeigh says...

I'm a little surprised at how low the average is (is that asking or sale price?) given that it will have been inflated by the odd property in Thorpe Bay and Leigh. We hear so much about the lack of "affordable homes" but with Help to Buy in the background, quite how low do average prices have to get before they are deemed "affordable"?
Or does everyone really mean "council houses"?
I'm a little surprised at how low the average is (is that asking or sale price?) given that it will have been inflated by the odd property in Thorpe Bay and Leigh. We hear so much about the lack of "affordable homes" but with Help to Buy in the background, quite how low do average prices have to get before they are deemed "affordable"? Or does everyone really mean "council houses"? GrumpyofLeigh

5:04pm Mon 25 Nov 13

jolllyboy says...

Affordable homes are still not affordable by those on low incomes. They may take up the Help to Buy and I reckon there will be another bubble burst in 7 years time because they wont be able to afford it.
Yes the sale of houses is because many like myself cannot stand the noise of the planes and dread any more 737s coming in for maintenance because that was horrendous. Those who work at the airport are welcome to the houses, they must be deaf.
Affordable homes are still not affordable by those on low incomes. They may take up the Help to Buy and I reckon there will be another bubble burst in 7 years time because they wont be able to afford it. Yes the sale of houses is because many like myself cannot stand the noise of the planes and dread any more 737s coming in for maintenance because that was horrendous. Those who work at the airport are welcome to the houses, they must be deaf. jolllyboy

5:52pm Mon 25 Nov 13

Southchurch Steve says...

emcee wrote:
We seem to be heading for a society where only the well-off can own homes and the working class can only do so if they are very, very lucky.
Time to bring in better rental regulation to protect good tenants and good landlords as we may be heading for a generation or two(maybe more) of a rental society.
I personally do not think there is anything wrong in home rental. The key thing being just that, a home, not just a roof over your head. New regulations must control rents (which should stamp out short term buy to let profiteers), protect long term tenants and ensure landlords maintain properties to a high standard. At the same time, landlords must be protected against tenants who do not pay rent and who mistreat the property.
This country could have a healthy and, dare I say it, attractive rental market if only it was regulated a lot better. In many parts of Europe renting thrives. Not because people cannot buy a home but because it is attractive to do so, both on the side of the tenant and of the landlord.
Why is there a massive amount of ill-feeling towards private landlords? Not all are the slum landlords reported in the press. Many are thoroughly decent people who have simply decided to invest in property. This investment is risky. You need to gamble on getting a tenant, have to pay all the maintenance costs, pay for insurance, gas and electricity certificates and run the HUGE risks that your tenant may not pay their rent or the house prices crash.

Short-term profiteering? Are you sure? Have you tried to buy or sell a house recently? Regardless of what some estate agents say, the actual prices of houses sold are barely moving, and have barely moved over the past few years. Add in a potential Interest Rate rise and the market is susceptible to a short term crash. There is no short term profiteering. These are long-term investments. You can't make a quick buck in the UK property market. And to make that work you need to find and look after a good tenant. Not cheap, not quick, not easy.
[quote][p][bold]emcee[/bold] wrote: We seem to be heading for a society where only the well-off can own homes and the working class can only do so if they are very, very lucky. Time to bring in better rental regulation to protect good tenants and good landlords as we may be heading for a generation or two(maybe more) of a rental society. I personally do not think there is anything wrong in home rental. The key thing being just that, a home, not just a roof over your head. New regulations must control rents (which should stamp out short term buy to let profiteers), protect long term tenants and ensure landlords maintain properties to a high standard. At the same time, landlords must be protected against tenants who do not pay rent and who mistreat the property. This country could have a healthy and, dare I say it, attractive rental market if only it was regulated a lot better. In many parts of Europe renting thrives. Not because people cannot buy a home but because it is attractive to do so, both on the side of the tenant and of the landlord.[/p][/quote]Why is there a massive amount of ill-feeling towards private landlords? Not all are the slum landlords reported in the press. Many are thoroughly decent people who have simply decided to invest in property. This investment is risky. You need to gamble on getting a tenant, have to pay all the maintenance costs, pay for insurance, gas and electricity certificates and run the HUGE risks that your tenant may not pay their rent or the house prices crash. Short-term profiteering? Are you sure? Have you tried to buy or sell a house recently? Regardless of what some estate agents say, the actual prices of houses sold are barely moving, and have barely moved over the past few years. Add in a potential Interest Rate rise and the market is susceptible to a short term crash. There is no short term profiteering. These are long-term investments. You can't make a quick buck in the UK property market. And to make that work you need to find and look after a good tenant. Not cheap, not quick, not easy. Southchurch Steve

9:11pm Mon 25 Nov 13

Joe Clark says...

jayman wrote:
Buy to let landlords are having a field day.. lots of London refugees who have escaped the Tory social cull out of London. This is pushing up prices artificially. These figures are just as worrying to an economist as they are to a social scientist.

without demographic data to support the economic claim, the above article makes some very hard reading to even the mildest of sceptics.

The echo have quoted an estate agent.... This yields about as much value as consulting the population of wormwood scrubs on government criminal justice policy...
You seriously can not support unlimited housing support for anyone who wants it there really must be a cap on what is paid, its a crazy situation where somebody who dose not want to work gets their housing bill paid for by me and the rest of the workforce.

I leave home at 5:00am to be at my desk at 9:00 I leave work at 5:00 get home normally just after 8:00pm that's 15hours I worked darn hard to be able to afford the home that I have why should those who have never and don't intend to ever go out and do a days work in their lives be funded to have a home like mine is it fair that those with a real work ethic fund those that only take?

I don't know if you work or if you own your own home but if you do work and do own your own home are you seriously in support of a system that supports laziness?

I seriously believe the dole or whatever it is called now needs to be changed so that people have to earn it and not expect it as a right, a set number of hours (say 12 a week) undertaking community work would give them a reason to get out of bed, drug testing should also be used.
[quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: Buy to let landlords are having a field day.. lots of London refugees who have escaped the Tory social cull out of London. This is pushing up prices artificially. These figures are just as worrying to an economist as they are to a social scientist. without demographic data to support the economic claim, the above article makes some very hard reading to even the mildest of sceptics. The echo have quoted an estate agent.... This yields about as much value as consulting the population of wormwood scrubs on government criminal justice policy...[/p][/quote]You seriously can not support unlimited housing support for anyone who wants it there really must be a cap on what is paid, its a crazy situation where somebody who dose not want to work gets their housing bill paid for by me and the rest of the workforce. I leave home at 5:00am to be at my desk at 9:00 I leave work at 5:00 get home normally just after 8:00pm that's 15hours I worked darn hard to be able to afford the home that I have why should those who have never and don't intend to ever go out and do a days work in their lives be funded to have a home like mine is it fair that those with a real work ethic fund those that only take? I don't know if you work or if you own your own home but if you do work and do own your own home are you seriously in support of a system that supports laziness? I seriously believe the dole or whatever it is called now needs to be changed so that people have to earn it and not expect it as a right, a set number of hours (say 12 a week) undertaking community work would give them a reason to get out of bed, drug testing should also be used. Joe Clark

9:38pm Mon 25 Nov 13

Pit Bird says...

I live in Westcliff and have been told by most estate agents they won't put many Southend or Westcliff terraced houses up for more than £250k max because of stamp duty even though in any London borough they would cost a lot more. I know friends who have not sold immaculate 4-6 bed terraces at all this year even dropping prices lower than normal. Not many sales going on round here.
I live in Westcliff and have been told by most estate agents they won't put many Southend or Westcliff terraced houses up for more than £250k max because of stamp duty even though in any London borough they would cost a lot more. I know friends who have not sold immaculate 4-6 bed terraces at all this year even dropping prices lower than normal. Not many sales going on round here. Pit Bird

10:34pm Mon 25 Nov 13

jayman says...

Joe Clark wrote:
jayman wrote:
Buy to let landlords are having a field day.. lots of London refugees who have escaped the Tory social cull out of London. This is pushing up prices artificially. These figures are just as worrying to an economist as they are to a social scientist.

without demographic data to support the economic claim, the above article makes some very hard reading to even the mildest of sceptics.

The echo have quoted an estate agent.... This yields about as much value as consulting the population of wormwood scrubs on government criminal justice policy...
You seriously can not support unlimited housing support for anyone who wants it there really must be a cap on what is paid, its a crazy situation where somebody who dose not want to work gets their housing bill paid for by me and the rest of the workforce.

I leave home at 5:00am to be at my desk at 9:00 I leave work at 5:00 get home normally just after 8:00pm that's 15hours I worked darn hard to be able to afford the home that I have why should those who have never and don't intend to ever go out and do a days work in their lives be funded to have a home like mine is it fair that those with a real work ethic fund those that only take?

I don't know if you work or if you own your own home but if you do work and do own your own home are you seriously in support of a system that supports laziness?

I seriously believe the dole or whatever it is called now needs to be changed so that people have to earn it and not expect it as a right, a set number of hours (say 12 a week) undertaking community work would give them a reason to get out of bed, drug testing should also be used.
hi joe.

allow me to fill you with some anecdotal nonsense

I work 7.15 (shift) hours a day at work. i have an autistic son who attends special school. i have two other children who attend mainstream school. I help my wife to do the pick up when I can. I am currently studding for an OU degree that I have taken a massive student loan out for. I have served six years in the army and have two campaign service medals. I am profoundly dyslexic and have overcome several barriers.

Despite the fact that I feel I have won some sort of abstract and pointless anecdotal back story/time commitment contest. This fills me with no joy. Though that would make an awesome back story for x-factor. I may even get two the second round! if only I could sing... Alas I digress...

what does fill me with justification is the fact that the Tory party are the party of social 'negative-sum power. They only serve themselves and there kind.

option A 'cap rents'
option B 'cap benefits'
'
option A would have normalised rent prices across the whole of the UK and would have been socially progressive.

option B would benefit private landlords and would change the entire social dynamics of our capital city and made it an even more exclusive place to live.

The wider picture is that the Tories want to change voting boundaries. They want to create 'super authorities' and amalgamate local councils. They have shifted vast numbers of people from there generationally connected home towns and support networks, from there places of work and school. They want to scrap the NHS, destroy workers rights and reduce the peoples right to democratic representation.
[quote][p][bold]Joe Clark[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: Buy to let landlords are having a field day.. lots of London refugees who have escaped the Tory social cull out of London. This is pushing up prices artificially. These figures are just as worrying to an economist as they are to a social scientist. without demographic data to support the economic claim, the above article makes some very hard reading to even the mildest of sceptics. The echo have quoted an estate agent.... This yields about as much value as consulting the population of wormwood scrubs on government criminal justice policy...[/p][/quote]You seriously can not support unlimited housing support for anyone who wants it there really must be a cap on what is paid, its a crazy situation where somebody who dose not want to work gets their housing bill paid for by me and the rest of the workforce. I leave home at 5:00am to be at my desk at 9:00 I leave work at 5:00 get home normally just after 8:00pm that's 15hours I worked darn hard to be able to afford the home that I have why should those who have never and don't intend to ever go out and do a days work in their lives be funded to have a home like mine is it fair that those with a real work ethic fund those that only take? I don't know if you work or if you own your own home but if you do work and do own your own home are you seriously in support of a system that supports laziness? I seriously believe the dole or whatever it is called now needs to be changed so that people have to earn it and not expect it as a right, a set number of hours (say 12 a week) undertaking community work would give them a reason to get out of bed, drug testing should also be used.[/p][/quote]hi joe. allow me to fill you with some anecdotal nonsense I work 7.15 (shift) hours a day at work. i have an autistic son who attends special school. i have two other children who attend mainstream school. I help my wife to do the pick up when I can. I am currently studding for an OU degree that I have taken a massive student loan out for. I have served six years in the army and have two campaign service medals. I am profoundly dyslexic and have overcome several barriers. Despite the fact that I feel I have won some sort of abstract and pointless anecdotal back story/time commitment contest. This fills me with no joy. Though that would make an awesome back story for x-factor. I may even get two the second round! if only I could sing... Alas I digress... what does fill me with justification is the fact that the Tory party are the party of social 'negative-sum power. They only serve themselves and there kind. option A 'cap rents' option B 'cap benefits' ' option A would have normalised rent prices across the whole of the UK and would have been socially progressive. option B would benefit private landlords and would change the entire social dynamics of our capital city and made it an even more exclusive place to live. The wider picture is that the Tories want to change voting boundaries. They want to create 'super authorities' and amalgamate local councils. They have shifted vast numbers of people from there generationally connected home towns and support networks, from there places of work and school. They want to scrap the NHS, destroy workers rights and reduce the peoples right to democratic representation. jayman

10:40pm Mon 25 Nov 13

jayman says...

jayman wrote:
Joe Clark wrote:
jayman wrote:
Buy to let landlords are having a field day.. lots of London refugees who have escaped the Tory social cull out of London. This is pushing up prices artificially. These figures are just as worrying to an economist as they are to a social scientist.

without demographic data to support the economic claim, the above article makes some very hard reading to even the mildest of sceptics.

The echo have quoted an estate agent.... This yields about as much value as consulting the population of wormwood scrubs on government criminal justice policy...
You seriously can not support unlimited housing support for anyone who wants it there really must be a cap on what is paid, its a crazy situation where somebody who dose not want to work gets their housing bill paid for by me and the rest of the workforce.

I leave home at 5:00am to be at my desk at 9:00 I leave work at 5:00 get home normally just after 8:00pm that's 15hours I worked darn hard to be able to afford the home that I have why should those who have never and don't intend to ever go out and do a days work in their lives be funded to have a home like mine is it fair that those with a real work ethic fund those that only take?

I don't know if you work or if you own your own home but if you do work and do own your own home are you seriously in support of a system that supports laziness?

I seriously believe the dole or whatever it is called now needs to be changed so that people have to earn it and not expect it as a right, a set number of hours (say 12 a week) undertaking community work would give them a reason to get out of bed, drug testing should also be used.
hi joe.

allow me to fill you with some anecdotal nonsense

I work 7.15 (shift) hours a day at work. i have an autistic son who attends special school. i have two other children who attend mainstream school. I help my wife to do the pick up when I can. I am currently studding for an OU degree that I have taken a massive student loan out for. I have served six years in the army and have two campaign service medals. I am profoundly dyslexic and have overcome several barriers.

Despite the fact that I feel I have won some sort of abstract and pointless anecdotal back story/time commitment contest. This fills me with no joy. Though that would make an awesome back story for x-factor. I may even get two the second round! if only I could sing... Alas I digress...

what does fill me with justification is the fact that the Tory party are the party of social 'negative-sum power. They only serve themselves and there kind.

option A 'cap rents'
option B 'cap benefits'
'
option A would have normalised rent prices across the whole of the UK and would have been socially progressive.

option B would benefit private landlords and would change the entire social dynamics of our capital city and made it an even more exclusive place to live.

The wider picture is that the Tories want to change voting boundaries. They want to create 'super authorities' and amalgamate local councils. They have shifted vast numbers of people from there generationally connected home towns and support networks, from there places of work and school. They want to scrap the NHS, destroy workers rights and reduce the peoples right to democratic representation.
oh... and I work. as stated above, and like many I claim 'in work' housing benefit' well... its not really 'my' benefit, its the 'landlords' benefit..
[quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Joe Clark[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: Buy to let landlords are having a field day.. lots of London refugees who have escaped the Tory social cull out of London. This is pushing up prices artificially. These figures are just as worrying to an economist as they are to a social scientist. without demographic data to support the economic claim, the above article makes some very hard reading to even the mildest of sceptics. The echo have quoted an estate agent.... This yields about as much value as consulting the population of wormwood scrubs on government criminal justice policy...[/p][/quote]You seriously can not support unlimited housing support for anyone who wants it there really must be a cap on what is paid, its a crazy situation where somebody who dose not want to work gets their housing bill paid for by me and the rest of the workforce. I leave home at 5:00am to be at my desk at 9:00 I leave work at 5:00 get home normally just after 8:00pm that's 15hours I worked darn hard to be able to afford the home that I have why should those who have never and don't intend to ever go out and do a days work in their lives be funded to have a home like mine is it fair that those with a real work ethic fund those that only take? I don't know if you work or if you own your own home but if you do work and do own your own home are you seriously in support of a system that supports laziness? I seriously believe the dole or whatever it is called now needs to be changed so that people have to earn it and not expect it as a right, a set number of hours (say 12 a week) undertaking community work would give them a reason to get out of bed, drug testing should also be used.[/p][/quote]hi joe. allow me to fill you with some anecdotal nonsense I work 7.15 (shift) hours a day at work. i have an autistic son who attends special school. i have two other children who attend mainstream school. I help my wife to do the pick up when I can. I am currently studding for an OU degree that I have taken a massive student loan out for. I have served six years in the army and have two campaign service medals. I am profoundly dyslexic and have overcome several barriers. Despite the fact that I feel I have won some sort of abstract and pointless anecdotal back story/time commitment contest. This fills me with no joy. Though that would make an awesome back story for x-factor. I may even get two the second round! if only I could sing... Alas I digress... what does fill me with justification is the fact that the Tory party are the party of social 'negative-sum power. They only serve themselves and there kind. option A 'cap rents' option B 'cap benefits' ' option A would have normalised rent prices across the whole of the UK and would have been socially progressive. option B would benefit private landlords and would change the entire social dynamics of our capital city and made it an even more exclusive place to live. The wider picture is that the Tories want to change voting boundaries. They want to create 'super authorities' and amalgamate local councils. They have shifted vast numbers of people from there generationally connected home towns and support networks, from there places of work and school. They want to scrap the NHS, destroy workers rights and reduce the peoples right to democratic representation.[/p][/quote]oh... and I work. as stated above, and like many I claim 'in work' housing benefit' well... its not really 'my' benefit, its the 'landlords' benefit.. jayman

11:23pm Mon 25 Nov 13

Joe Clark says...

jayman wrote:
jayman wrote:
Joe Clark wrote:
jayman wrote:
Buy to let landlords are having a field day.. lots of London refugees who have escaped the Tory social cull out of London. This is pushing up prices artificially. These figures are just as worrying to an economist as they are to a social scientist.

without demographic data to support the economic claim, the above article makes some very hard reading to even the mildest of sceptics.

The echo have quoted an estate agent.... This yields about as much value as consulting the population of wormwood scrubs on government criminal justice policy...
You seriously can not support unlimited housing support for anyone who wants it there really must be a cap on what is paid, its a crazy situation where somebody who dose not want to work gets their housing bill paid for by me and the rest of the workforce.

I leave home at 5:00am to be at my desk at 9:00 I leave work at 5:00 get home normally just after 8:00pm that's 15hours I worked darn hard to be able to afford the home that I have why should those who have never and don't intend to ever go out and do a days work in their lives be funded to have a home like mine is it fair that those with a real work ethic fund those that only take?

I don't know if you work or if you own your own home but if you do work and do own your own home are you seriously in support of a system that supports laziness?

I seriously believe the dole or whatever it is called now needs to be changed so that people have to earn it and not expect it as a right, a set number of hours (say 12 a week) undertaking community work would give them a reason to get out of bed, drug testing should also be used.
hi joe.

allow me to fill you with some anecdotal nonsense

I work 7.15 (shift) hours a day at work. i have an autistic son who attends special school. i have two other children who attend mainstream school. I help my wife to do the pick up when I can. I am currently studding for an OU degree that I have taken a massive student loan out for. I have served six years in the army and have two campaign service medals. I am profoundly dyslexic and have overcome several barriers.

Despite the fact that I feel I have won some sort of abstract and pointless anecdotal back story/time commitment contest. This fills me with no joy. Though that would make an awesome back story for x-factor. I may even get two the second round! if only I could sing... Alas I digress...

what does fill me with justification is the fact that the Tory party are the party of social 'negative-sum power. They only serve themselves and there kind.

option A 'cap rents'
option B 'cap benefits'
'
option A would have normalised rent prices across the whole of the UK and would have been socially progressive.

option B would benefit private landlords and would change the entire social dynamics of our capital city and made it an even more exclusive place to live.

The wider picture is that the Tories want to change voting boundaries. They want to create 'super authorities' and amalgamate local councils. They have shifted vast numbers of people from there generationally connected home towns and support networks, from there places of work and school. They want to scrap the NHS, destroy workers rights and reduce the peoples right to democratic representation.
oh... and I work. as stated above, and like many I claim 'in work' housing benefit' well... its not really 'my' benefit, its the 'landlords' benefit..
I know what dyslexia is like had a nightmare of a time with it at school, still have issues but not as bad just get a few letters round the wrong way or get confused over dose & does, bought & brought and other such similar words, but all those that took the weewee (you know what word I really mean!) are not laughing any more as I knocked down and pushed and pushed and pushed myself to improve myself and get a job I slowly worked my way from the bottom to a position in the boardroom yes some I still get some stick mostly from the parachuted in university k-no-bs who have not done a days hard graft and had mummy and daddy take care of all their bills wipe their bums and give "Tarquin" whatever he has stamped his little feet for, me however I will not buy anything until I have the cash in hand to pay for it, I don't have a credit card I have a debit card if the funds not there I can't use it I think its a better way to do things instead of slapping it all on credit.

I don't agree with the Human Rights Act as set down by Europe it needs changes, mostly to protect the victims of crimes as at present the criminal has the same rights as the victim. Somebody who has done inappropriate things to a child should not have the same rights as the child, if you take a life then the state should be able to take or at the very least lock you up for life, the victim will never see a sunrise again whilst the guilty will, it just dose not seem fair to me.
[quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Joe Clark[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: Buy to let landlords are having a field day.. lots of London refugees who have escaped the Tory social cull out of London. This is pushing up prices artificially. These figures are just as worrying to an economist as they are to a social scientist. without demographic data to support the economic claim, the above article makes some very hard reading to even the mildest of sceptics. The echo have quoted an estate agent.... This yields about as much value as consulting the population of wormwood scrubs on government criminal justice policy...[/p][/quote]You seriously can not support unlimited housing support for anyone who wants it there really must be a cap on what is paid, its a crazy situation where somebody who dose not want to work gets their housing bill paid for by me and the rest of the workforce. I leave home at 5:00am to be at my desk at 9:00 I leave work at 5:00 get home normally just after 8:00pm that's 15hours I worked darn hard to be able to afford the home that I have why should those who have never and don't intend to ever go out and do a days work in their lives be funded to have a home like mine is it fair that those with a real work ethic fund those that only take? I don't know if you work or if you own your own home but if you do work and do own your own home are you seriously in support of a system that supports laziness? I seriously believe the dole or whatever it is called now needs to be changed so that people have to earn it and not expect it as a right, a set number of hours (say 12 a week) undertaking community work would give them a reason to get out of bed, drug testing should also be used.[/p][/quote]hi joe. allow me to fill you with some anecdotal nonsense I work 7.15 (shift) hours a day at work. i have an autistic son who attends special school. i have two other children who attend mainstream school. I help my wife to do the pick up when I can. I am currently studding for an OU degree that I have taken a massive student loan out for. I have served six years in the army and have two campaign service medals. I am profoundly dyslexic and have overcome several barriers. Despite the fact that I feel I have won some sort of abstract and pointless anecdotal back story/time commitment contest. This fills me with no joy. Though that would make an awesome back story for x-factor. I may even get two the second round! if only I could sing... Alas I digress... what does fill me with justification is the fact that the Tory party are the party of social 'negative-sum power. They only serve themselves and there kind. option A 'cap rents' option B 'cap benefits' ' option A would have normalised rent prices across the whole of the UK and would have been socially progressive. option B would benefit private landlords and would change the entire social dynamics of our capital city and made it an even more exclusive place to live. The wider picture is that the Tories want to change voting boundaries. They want to create 'super authorities' and amalgamate local councils. They have shifted vast numbers of people from there generationally connected home towns and support networks, from there places of work and school. They want to scrap the NHS, destroy workers rights and reduce the peoples right to democratic representation.[/p][/quote]oh... and I work. as stated above, and like many I claim 'in work' housing benefit' well... its not really 'my' benefit, its the 'landlords' benefit..[/p][/quote]I know what dyslexia is like had a nightmare of a time with it at school, still have issues but not as bad just get a few letters round the wrong way or get confused over dose & does, bought & brought and other such similar words, but all those that took the weewee (you know what word I really mean!) are not laughing any more as I knocked down and pushed and pushed and pushed myself to improve myself and get a job I slowly worked my way from the bottom to a position in the boardroom yes some I still get some stick mostly from the parachuted in university k-no-bs who have not done a days hard graft and had mummy and daddy take care of all their bills wipe their bums and give "Tarquin" whatever he has stamped his little feet for, me however I will not buy anything until I have the cash in hand to pay for it, I don't have a credit card I have a debit card if the funds not there I can't use it I think its a better way to do things instead of slapping it all on credit. I don't agree with the Human Rights Act as set down by Europe it needs changes, mostly to protect the victims of crimes as at present the criminal has the same rights as the victim. Somebody who has done inappropriate things to a child should not have the same rights as the child, if you take a life then the state should be able to take or at the very least lock you up for life, the victim will never see a sunrise again whilst the guilty will, it just dose not seem fair to me. Joe Clark

11:43pm Mon 25 Nov 13

jayman says...

you are confusing the 'human rights act 1998' with the 'European convention on human rights' they are similar yet fundamentally different. 'HRA 1998' is enforced by UK courts. 'ECHR' is enforced by the European court of human rights.

This is a clear and fundamental distinction that the Tory party and the Daily mail purposefully distort.

The Tories want to repeal the 'HRA 1998' and they want to leave the European union (the only way to exit from the ECHR conventions.) They have no intention of backfilling any of these human rights laws.

Basically they (the Tory party) want a giant poopoo sandwich, the British workers former basic rights will be the added filling. every 'less affluent' British citizen will be expected to tuck in.
you are confusing the 'human rights act 1998' with the 'European convention on human rights' they are similar yet fundamentally different. 'HRA 1998' is enforced by UK courts. 'ECHR' is enforced by the European court of human rights. This is a clear and fundamental distinction that the Tory party and the Daily mail purposefully distort. The Tories want to repeal the 'HRA 1998' and they want to leave the European union (the only way to exit from the ECHR conventions.) They have no intention of backfilling any of these human rights laws. Basically they (the Tory party) want a giant poopoo sandwich, the British workers former basic rights will be the added filling. every 'less affluent' British citizen will be expected to tuck in. jayman

12:04am Tue 26 Nov 13

jayman says...

anyway.. back to topic. The house prices are being cooked by the governments socially retrograde policies..
anyway.. back to topic. The house prices are being cooked by the governments socially retrograde policies.. jayman

7:15am Tue 26 Nov 13

whateverhappened says...

Doesn't answer why non working and in many cases non british familes can live in parts of london that most hard working familes could only dream of (if you wanted to live in london) yet can do so without paying, or paying into the system that provides for them. Anyone who thinks £500 a week is not enough hand out must be mad, it is unfortunate if these people are ending up in southend but not suprising
Doesn't answer why non working and in many cases non british familes can live in parts of london that most hard working familes could only dream of (if you wanted to live in london) yet can do so without paying, or paying into the system that provides for them. Anyone who thinks £500 a week is not enough hand out must be mad, it is unfortunate if these people are ending up in southend but not suprising whateverhappened

8:05am Tue 26 Nov 13

pembury53 says...

“We sold one late yesterday and another two this morning” .......... yes hurry up folks there'll be nothing left if you don't panic and buy now !!!!! trust me, i'm an estate agent.......
“We sold one late yesterday and another two this morning” .......... yes hurry up folks there'll be nothing left if you don't panic and buy now !!!!! trust me, i'm an estate agent....... pembury53

9:08am Tue 26 Nov 13

jayman says...

whateverhappened wrote:
Doesn't answer why non working and in many cases non british familes can live in parts of london that most hard working familes could only dream of (if you wanted to live in london) yet can do so without paying, or paying into the system that provides for them. Anyone who thinks £500 a week is not enough hand out must be mad, it is unfortunate if these people are ending up in southend but not suprising
Yet you cannot bring yourself to admit that the vast amount of housing benefit claimants (in London and across the UK) are in receipt of 'In work' housing benefit. we have built ourselves a system that no mad man would dare create.. The government are subsidising landlords and employers (housing benefit/working tax credit) the government are cooking house prices with initiatives that make experienced economists very worried.

but hay... It's far too wild to consider the concept of building social housing at low cost rent. It would be preposterous to think that that social housing unit will generate a saving to the tax payer (occupant will also be a tax payer). it would be beyond our wildest dreams to enforce a 'living wage' at a sustainable level and to cut working tax credit in line with wage increases.

ask yourself several questions

why where the slums demolished during the 'slum Clearance'..
why was low rent 'social housing' built in the first place..
why is the government pushing house prices up again to levels that where declared 'unsustainable' and 'overvalued' following the economic downturn review..
[quote][p][bold]whateverhappened[/bold] wrote: Doesn't answer why non working and in many cases non british familes can live in parts of london that most hard working familes could only dream of (if you wanted to live in london) yet can do so without paying, or paying into the system that provides for them. Anyone who thinks £500 a week is not enough hand out must be mad, it is unfortunate if these people are ending up in southend but not suprising[/p][/quote]Yet you cannot bring yourself to admit that the vast amount of housing benefit claimants (in London and across the UK) are in receipt of 'In work' housing benefit. we have built ourselves a system that no mad man would dare create.. The government are subsidising landlords and employers (housing benefit/working tax credit) the government are cooking house prices with initiatives that make experienced economists very worried. but hay... It's far too wild to consider the concept of building social housing at low cost rent. It would be preposterous to think that that social housing unit will generate a saving to the tax payer (occupant will also be a tax payer). it would be beyond our wildest dreams to enforce a 'living wage' at a sustainable level and to cut working tax credit in line with wage increases. ask yourself several questions why where the slums demolished during the 'slum Clearance'.. why was low rent 'social housing' built in the first place.. why is the government pushing house prices up again to levels that where declared 'unsustainable' and 'overvalued' following the economic downturn review.. jayman

10:05am Tue 26 Nov 13

pembury53 says...

jayman wrote:
whateverhappened wrote: Doesn't answer why non working and in many cases non british familes can live in parts of london that most hard working familes could only dream of (if you wanted to live in london) yet can do so without paying, or paying into the system that provides for them. Anyone who thinks £500 a week is not enough hand out must be mad, it is unfortunate if these people are ending up in southend but not suprising
Yet you cannot bring yourself to admit that the vast amount of housing benefit claimants (in London and across the UK) are in receipt of 'In work' housing benefit. we have built ourselves a system that no mad man would dare create.. The government are subsidising landlords and employers (housing benefit/working tax credit) the government are cooking house prices with initiatives that make experienced economists very worried. but hay... It's far too wild to consider the concept of building social housing at low cost rent. It would be preposterous to think that that social housing unit will generate a saving to the tax payer (occupant will also be a tax payer). it would be beyond our wildest dreams to enforce a 'living wage' at a sustainable level and to cut working tax credit in line with wage increases. ask yourself several questions why where the slums demolished during the 'slum Clearance'.. why was low rent 'social housing' built in the first place.. why is the government pushing house prices up again to levels that where declared 'unsustainable' and 'overvalued' following the economic downturn review..
quite right jayman......... and one of the reasons is that this government would never dream of putting social need and economic reality ahead of the 'right' of an individual to own 26 houses......
[quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]whateverhappened[/bold] wrote: Doesn't answer why non working and in many cases non british familes can live in parts of london that most hard working familes could only dream of (if you wanted to live in london) yet can do so without paying, or paying into the system that provides for them. Anyone who thinks £500 a week is not enough hand out must be mad, it is unfortunate if these people are ending up in southend but not suprising[/p][/quote]Yet you cannot bring yourself to admit that the vast amount of housing benefit claimants (in London and across the UK) are in receipt of 'In work' housing benefit. we have built ourselves a system that no mad man would dare create.. The government are subsidising landlords and employers (housing benefit/working tax credit) the government are cooking house prices with initiatives that make experienced economists very worried. but hay... It's far too wild to consider the concept of building social housing at low cost rent. It would be preposterous to think that that social housing unit will generate a saving to the tax payer (occupant will also be a tax payer). it would be beyond our wildest dreams to enforce a 'living wage' at a sustainable level and to cut working tax credit in line with wage increases. ask yourself several questions why where the slums demolished during the 'slum Clearance'.. why was low rent 'social housing' built in the first place.. why is the government pushing house prices up again to levels that where declared 'unsustainable' and 'overvalued' following the economic downturn review..[/p][/quote]quite right jayman......... and one of the reasons is that this government would never dream of putting social need and economic reality ahead of the 'right' of an individual to own 26 houses...... pembury53

9:44pm Tue 26 Nov 13

echoforum says...

pembury53 wrote:
jayman wrote:
whateverhappened wrote: Doesn't answer why non working and in many cases non british familes can live in parts of london that most hard working familes could only dream of (if you wanted to live in london) yet can do so without paying, or paying into the system that provides for them. Anyone who thinks £500 a week is not enough hand out must be mad, it is unfortunate if these people are ending up in southend but not suprising
Yet you cannot bring yourself to admit that the vast amount of housing benefit claimants (in London and across the UK) are in receipt of 'In work' housing benefit. we have built ourselves a system that no mad man would dare create.. The government are subsidising landlords and employers (housing benefit/working tax credit) the government are cooking house prices with initiatives that make experienced economists very worried. but hay... It's far too wild to consider the concept of building social housing at low cost rent. It would be preposterous to think that that social housing unit will generate a saving to the tax payer (occupant will also be a tax payer). it would be beyond our wildest dreams to enforce a 'living wage' at a sustainable level and to cut working tax credit in line with wage increases. ask yourself several questions why where the slums demolished during the 'slum Clearance'.. why was low rent 'social housing' built in the first place.. why is the government pushing house prices up again to levels that where declared 'unsustainable' and 'overvalued' following the economic downturn review..
quite right jayman......... and one of the reasons is that this government would never dream of putting social need and economic reality ahead of the 'right' of an individual to own 26 houses......
Excellent points.
Tax-payers paying Landlords(via benefits).Taxpayers paying deposit on £600k second homes(via help to buy).
Another Property Boom..
Not to sure where we are going as a nation ..fast forward 10 years and it aint gonna be pretty
[quote][p][bold]pembury53[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]whateverhappened[/bold] wrote: Doesn't answer why non working and in many cases non british familes can live in parts of london that most hard working familes could only dream of (if you wanted to live in london) yet can do so without paying, or paying into the system that provides for them. Anyone who thinks £500 a week is not enough hand out must be mad, it is unfortunate if these people are ending up in southend but not suprising[/p][/quote]Yet you cannot bring yourself to admit that the vast amount of housing benefit claimants (in London and across the UK) are in receipt of 'In work' housing benefit. we have built ourselves a system that no mad man would dare create.. The government are subsidising landlords and employers (housing benefit/working tax credit) the government are cooking house prices with initiatives that make experienced economists very worried. but hay... It's far too wild to consider the concept of building social housing at low cost rent. It would be preposterous to think that that social housing unit will generate a saving to the tax payer (occupant will also be a tax payer). it would be beyond our wildest dreams to enforce a 'living wage' at a sustainable level and to cut working tax credit in line with wage increases. ask yourself several questions why where the slums demolished during the 'slum Clearance'.. why was low rent 'social housing' built in the first place.. why is the government pushing house prices up again to levels that where declared 'unsustainable' and 'overvalued' following the economic downturn review..[/p][/quote]quite right jayman......... and one of the reasons is that this government would never dream of putting social need and economic reality ahead of the 'right' of an individual to own 26 houses......[/p][/quote]Excellent points. Tax-payers paying Landlords(via benefits).Taxpayers paying deposit on £600k second homes(via help to buy). Another Property Boom.. Not to sure where we are going as a nation ..fast forward 10 years and it aint gonna be pretty echoforum

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