Westcliff High School for Girls record second best GCSE results in country

Top ranking - Westcliff High School for Girls came second in the country in their GCSE results

Top ranking - Westcliff High School for Girls came second in the country in their GCSE results

First published in Southend by

WESTCLIFF High School for Girls is ranked second in the country in a table of the highest achieving pupils.

The grammar school was among 81 highest-attaining schools in England at GCSE level.

All the pupils in the schools listed attained the benchmark standard of five A* to C grades in GCSEs or equivalent qualifications, including maths and English GCSEs.

The average number of points scored per pupil was then used to rank the schools.

Westcliff High’s average was 783.7 points and beaten only by Colyton School, in Kent, where the average was 882.5.

The Echo contacted Westcliff High but headteacher Dr Paul Haymen declined to comment.

James Courtenay, Southend councillor responsible for education and learning, said: “It is a wonderful achievement and goes to show how well the school is run. The school is a great asset to the town. I am really pleased with the results of pupils, especially those from Southend.

“The school is not only able to get amazing results like this, it is also helping with other schools across the town to share their expertise.”

Southend High School for Girls was also placed 14th on the list with an average point score per pupil of 660.

Comments (25)

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8:02am Sat 25 Jan 14

OBL says...

Well done to the students at WHSG, as an old girl, that makes for good reading!
Well done to the students at WHSG, as an old girl, that makes for good reading! OBL
  • Score: 19

8:18am Sat 25 Jan 14

Thames Gateway says...

Good results for WHSG, SHSG, Southend and Essex altogether.

Fail in Geography to Echo reporter as Colyton Grammar is in Devon!

Is is true that these figures are not truly representative of the UK situation, as it does not include equivalent qualifications that many private schools do, for instance IGCSEs?
Good results for WHSG, SHSG, Southend and Essex altogether. Fail in Geography to Echo reporter as Colyton Grammar is in Devon! Is is true that these figures are not truly representative of the UK situation, as it does not include equivalent qualifications that many private schools do, for instance IGCSEs? Thames Gateway
  • Score: 6

8:27am Sat 25 Jan 14

Leon__ says...

Second but not first -- must try harder.
Second but not first -- must try harder. Leon__
  • Score: 1

10:31am Sat 25 Jan 14

blackheart says...

Confused was it second or 14th?
Confused was it second or 14th? blackheart
  • Score: -4

10:31am Sat 25 Jan 14

blackheart says...

Oh got it Southend was 14th.
Oh got it Southend was 14th. blackheart
  • Score: 0

1:55pm Sat 25 Jan 14

disgusted of essex says...

Not surprised they have done so well they hand pick there students from all over Essex and beyond.
Not surprised they have done so well they hand pick there students from all over Essex and beyond. disgusted of essex
  • Score: -17

4:48pm Sat 25 Jan 14

rhowes says...

This school is now an Academy!!! We have no Grammar School's left.

Please tell the press.
This school is now an Academy!!! We have no Grammar School's left. Please tell the press. rhowes
  • Score: -23

1:26am Sun 26 Jan 14

>insert username here says...

This is all well and good but they do tend to suck the life out of students.. I was offered places into WHSG for 6th form, there's a reason I declined
This is all well and good but they do tend to suck the life out of students.. I was offered places into WHSG for 6th form, there's a reason I declined >insert username here
  • Score: -10

10:02am Sun 26 Jan 14

luvinlife says...

Fantastic to have such a high achieving school in the town. I wish there wasn't such a divide in the best and worst though.
Fantastic to have such a high achieving school in the town. I wish there wasn't such a divide in the best and worst though. luvinlife
  • Score: 15

12:19pm Sun 26 Jan 14

southend loser says...

Great school in a great town.
anybody who shouts the place down,just move out
Great school in a great town. anybody who shouts the place down,just move out southend loser
  • Score: 20

3:03pm Sun 26 Jan 14

stopmoaning1 says...

disgusted of essex wrote:
Not surprised they have done so well they hand pick there students from all over Essex and beyond.
If by 'hand picked' you mean they offere places to students who pass the eleven plus, then I guess you're right.
Don't forget, there is no prerequisite for the eleven plus, it's open to EVERY year six student.
On reading your post, my guess would be you didn't pass.
[quote][p][bold]disgusted of essex[/bold] wrote: Not surprised they have done so well they hand pick there students from all over Essex and beyond.[/p][/quote]If by 'hand picked' you mean they offere places to students who pass the eleven plus, then I guess you're right. Don't forget, there is no prerequisite for the eleven plus, it's open to EVERY year six student. On reading your post, my guess would be you didn't pass. stopmoaning1
  • Score: 21

3:07pm Sun 26 Jan 14

stopmoaning1 says...

rhowes wrote:
This school is now an Academy!!! We have no Grammar School's left.

Please tell the press.
If you really want to be pedantic, they are actually classified as 'Academy Grammar Schools'
I'll let the press know!
[quote][p][bold]rhowes[/bold] wrote: This school is now an Academy!!! We have no Grammar School's left. Please tell the press.[/p][/quote]If you really want to be pedantic, they are actually classified as 'Academy Grammar Schools' I'll let the press know! stopmoaning1
  • Score: 13

3:27pm Sun 26 Jan 14

rhowes says...

Pity the boy's school at Westcliff produces extreme politicians like Tory Mr Bone MP, and the ex Labout Minister John Hutton.
Pity the boy's school at Westcliff produces extreme politicians like Tory Mr Bone MP, and the ex Labout Minister John Hutton. rhowes
  • Score: -12

4:33pm Sun 26 Jan 14

stopmoaning1 says...

>insert username here wrote:
This is all well and good but they do tend to suck the life out of students.. I was offered places into WHSG for 6th form, there's a reason I declined
So how many 'places' were you offered and don't you have to actually apply to be accepted to sixth form? (My daughter did at SHSG despite her already being a student there)
[quote][p][bold]>insert username here[/bold] wrote: This is all well and good but they do tend to suck the life out of students.. I was offered places into WHSG for 6th form, there's a reason I declined[/p][/quote]So how many 'places' were you offered and don't you have to actually apply to be accepted to sixth form? (My daughter did at SHSG despite her already being a student there) stopmoaning1
  • Score: 14

4:39pm Sun 26 Jan 14

Logopolitan says...

It's easy to be the best if you make sure that you only get the most able kids to start with. Some of these kids are so bright they probably could teach themselves. A good test might be to take a class from Chase or Futures and get the WHSG staff to teach them and look at the results. Then we could see if it was the quality of the school or the kids going in that decided the results.
It's easy to be the best if you make sure that you only get the most able kids to start with. Some of these kids are so bright they probably could teach themselves. A good test might be to take a class from Chase or Futures and get the WHSG staff to teach them and look at the results. Then we could see if it was the quality of the school or the kids going in that decided the results. Logopolitan
  • Score: -5

5:58pm Sun 26 Jan 14

Alec Cikes says...

Logopolitan wrote:
It's easy to be the best if you make sure that you only get the most able kids to start with. Some of these kids are so bright they probably could teach themselves. A good test might be to take a class from Chase or Futures and get the WHSG staff to teach them and look at the results. Then we could see if it was the quality of the school or the kids going in that decided the results.
I tend to agree with you Logopolitan.
[quote][p][bold]Logopolitan[/bold] wrote: It's easy to be the best if you make sure that you only get the most able kids to start with. Some of these kids are so bright they probably could teach themselves. A good test might be to take a class from Chase or Futures and get the WHSG staff to teach them and look at the results. Then we could see if it was the quality of the school or the kids going in that decided the results.[/p][/quote]I tend to agree with you Logopolitan. Alec Cikes
  • Score: -4

6:38pm Sun 26 Jan 14

stopmoaning1 says...

Logopolitan wrote:
It's easy to be the best if you make sure that you only get the most able kids to start with. Some of these kids are so bright they probably could teach themselves. A good test might be to take a class from Chase or Futures and get the WHSG staff to teach them and look at the results. Then we could see if it was the quality of the school or the kids going in that decided the results.
Well of course it's the kids. Generally those who take the eleven plus WANT to do well.

Ask the Chase and Futures pupils and parents their views on education and I wouldn't mind betting that **generally**speakin
g it won't be the same as the grammars. They could have easily taken the eleven plus themselves. As I've said previously, there is no prerequisite for the eleven plus, it's open for EVERY year six student.

And are you saying the Chase and Futures teachers are not up to standard? I bet if you let them teach kids who WANT to do well the results would as good.
[quote][p][bold]Logopolitan[/bold] wrote: It's easy to be the best if you make sure that you only get the most able kids to start with. Some of these kids are so bright they probably could teach themselves. A good test might be to take a class from Chase or Futures and get the WHSG staff to teach them and look at the results. Then we could see if it was the quality of the school or the kids going in that decided the results.[/p][/quote]Well of course it's the kids. Generally those who take the eleven plus WANT to do well. Ask the Chase and Futures pupils and parents their views on education and I wouldn't mind betting that **generally**speakin g it won't be the same as the grammars. They could have easily taken the eleven plus themselves. As I've said previously, there is no prerequisite for the eleven plus, it's open for EVERY year six student. And are you saying the Chase and Futures teachers are not up to standard? I bet if you let them teach kids who WANT to do well the results would as good. stopmoaning1
  • Score: 15

7:56pm Sun 26 Jan 14

Logopolitan says...

stopmoaning1 wrote:
Logopolitan wrote:
It's easy to be the best if you make sure that you only get the most able kids to start with. Some of these kids are so bright they probably could teach themselves. A good test might be to take a class from Chase or Futures and get the WHSG staff to teach them and look at the results. Then we could see if it was the quality of the school or the kids going in that decided the results.
Well of course it's the kids. Generally those who take the eleven plus WANT to do well.

Ask the Chase and Futures pupils and parents their views on education and I wouldn't mind betting that **generally**speakin

g it won't be the same as the grammars. They could have easily taken the eleven plus themselves. As I've said previously, there is no prerequisite for the eleven plus, it's open for EVERY year six student.

And are you saying the Chase and Futures teachers are not up to standard? I bet if you let them teach kids who WANT to do well the results would as good.
Quite the opposite I think if the Chase and Futures teachers had a more mixed ability cohort their results would be very different. However it looks like the new head at Futures may not agree given the number of vacancies for new senior staff that are being advertised on their website! More seriously though, it is a much more attractive proposition to teach at a grammar - the chance to teach A Level, better behaviour etc. I can see why the other schools may struggle to recruit.
Unfortunately my kids are not in the top 10% of their year (which is roughly the number that pass the 11+ in their primary) so it gets me quite cross that they are consigned to what looks like a second rate education. You may think that these kids/parents are not interested but you are talking about some that may be in the brightest 25% of the population, just not the top 10%. Look at the detailed statistics for Chase on their website - only about a third of the kids were even entered for GCSE science. It seems that they have already been written off. With this poverty of expectation who can blame parents for being worried?
[quote][p][bold]stopmoaning1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Logopolitan[/bold] wrote: It's easy to be the best if you make sure that you only get the most able kids to start with. Some of these kids are so bright they probably could teach themselves. A good test might be to take a class from Chase or Futures and get the WHSG staff to teach them and look at the results. Then we could see if it was the quality of the school or the kids going in that decided the results.[/p][/quote]Well of course it's the kids. Generally those who take the eleven plus WANT to do well. Ask the Chase and Futures pupils and parents their views on education and I wouldn't mind betting that **generally**speakin g it won't be the same as the grammars. They could have easily taken the eleven plus themselves. As I've said previously, there is no prerequisite for the eleven plus, it's open for EVERY year six student. And are you saying the Chase and Futures teachers are not up to standard? I bet if you let them teach kids who WANT to do well the results would as good.[/p][/quote]Quite the opposite I think if the Chase and Futures teachers had a more mixed ability cohort their results would be very different. However it looks like the new head at Futures may not agree given the number of vacancies for new senior staff that are being advertised on their website! More seriously though, it is a much more attractive proposition to teach at a grammar - the chance to teach A Level, better behaviour etc. I can see why the other schools may struggle to recruit. Unfortunately my kids are not in the top 10% of their year (which is roughly the number that pass the 11+ in their primary) so it gets me quite cross that they are consigned to what looks like a second rate education. You may think that these kids/parents are not interested but you are talking about some that may be in the brightest 25% of the population, just not the top 10%. Look at the detailed statistics for Chase on their website - only about a third of the kids were even entered for GCSE science. It seems that they have already been written off. With this poverty of expectation who can blame parents for being worried? Logopolitan
  • Score: 5

10:11am Mon 27 Jan 14

eurodoomed says...

There is no longer any dispute that the destructionn of almost all grammar schools was the single most disastrous act of the 1960s and 70s, and is the main reason for the lamentable state of primary and secondary school education now.
Grammar schools offered top education to all without reference to wealth or social status and were thus the best way for able children whose parents could not afford private education to come through.
Even now, politicians are scared to recognise this fundamental truth for fear of upsetting the left wing establishment that has dominated education for 50 wasted years.
There is no longer any dispute that the destructionn of almost all grammar schools was the single most disastrous act of the 1960s and 70s, and is the main reason for the lamentable state of primary and secondary school education now. Grammar schools offered top education to all without reference to wealth or social status and were thus the best way for able children whose parents could not afford private education to come through. Even now, politicians are scared to recognise this fundamental truth for fear of upsetting the left wing establishment that has dominated education for 50 wasted years. eurodoomed
  • Score: 7

2:12pm Mon 27 Jan 14

stopmoaning1 says...

Logopolitan wrote:
stopmoaning1 wrote:
Logopolitan wrote:
It's easy to be the best if you make sure that you only get the most able kids to start with. Some of these kids are so bright they probably could teach themselves. A good test might be to take a class from Chase or Futures and get the WHSG staff to teach them and look at the results. Then we could see if it was the quality of the school or the kids going in that decided the results.
Well of course it's the kids. Generally those who take the eleven plus WANT to do well.

Ask the Chase and Futures pupils and parents their views on education and I wouldn't mind betting that **generally**speakin


g it won't be the same as the grammars. They could have easily taken the eleven plus themselves. As I've said previously, there is no prerequisite for the eleven plus, it's open for EVERY year six student.

And are you saying the Chase and Futures teachers are not up to standard? I bet if you let them teach kids who WANT to do well the results would as good.
Quite the opposite I think if the Chase and Futures teachers had a more mixed ability cohort their results would be very different. However it looks like the new head at Futures may not agree given the number of vacancies for new senior staff that are being advertised on their website! More seriously though, it is a much more attractive proposition to teach at a grammar - the chance to teach A Level, better behaviour etc. I can see why the other schools may struggle to recruit.
Unfortunately my kids are not in the top 10% of their year (which is roughly the number that pass the 11+ in their primary) so it gets me quite cross that they are consigned to what looks like a second rate education. You may think that these kids/parents are not interested but you are talking about some that may be in the brightest 25% of the population, just not the top 10%. Look at the detailed statistics for Chase on their website - only about a third of the kids were even entered for GCSE science. It seems that they have already been written off. With this poverty of expectation who can blame parents for being worried?
Indeed, which is why I was careful to highlight the word **generally.**

The fact is that although my own daughter went to SHSG, my son did not pass the eleven plus and went to our local secondary.
Yes it was frustrating at times but he did want to do well, and worked hard to get good GCSE results . The school did not offer the A levels he wanted to do so he had to change schools for sixth form where again he did well because he WANTED to.

Dare I suggest that the third of the kids entered for GCSE science at Chase were the only ones who WANTED to do it?
[quote][p][bold]Logopolitan[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]stopmoaning1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Logopolitan[/bold] wrote: It's easy to be the best if you make sure that you only get the most able kids to start with. Some of these kids are so bright they probably could teach themselves. A good test might be to take a class from Chase or Futures and get the WHSG staff to teach them and look at the results. Then we could see if it was the quality of the school or the kids going in that decided the results.[/p][/quote]Well of course it's the kids. Generally those who take the eleven plus WANT to do well. Ask the Chase and Futures pupils and parents their views on education and I wouldn't mind betting that **generally**speakin g it won't be the same as the grammars. They could have easily taken the eleven plus themselves. As I've said previously, there is no prerequisite for the eleven plus, it's open for EVERY year six student. And are you saying the Chase and Futures teachers are not up to standard? I bet if you let them teach kids who WANT to do well the results would as good.[/p][/quote]Quite the opposite I think if the Chase and Futures teachers had a more mixed ability cohort their results would be very different. However it looks like the new head at Futures may not agree given the number of vacancies for new senior staff that are being advertised on their website! More seriously though, it is a much more attractive proposition to teach at a grammar - the chance to teach A Level, better behaviour etc. I can see why the other schools may struggle to recruit. Unfortunately my kids are not in the top 10% of their year (which is roughly the number that pass the 11+ in their primary) so it gets me quite cross that they are consigned to what looks like a second rate education. You may think that these kids/parents are not interested but you are talking about some that may be in the brightest 25% of the population, just not the top 10%. Look at the detailed statistics for Chase on their website - only about a third of the kids were even entered for GCSE science. It seems that they have already been written off. With this poverty of expectation who can blame parents for being worried?[/p][/quote]Indeed, which is why I was careful to highlight the word **generally.** The fact is that although my own daughter went to SHSG, my son did not pass the eleven plus and went to our local secondary. Yes it was frustrating at times but he did want to do well, and worked hard to get good GCSE results . The school did not offer the A levels he wanted to do so he had to change schools for sixth form where again he did well because he WANTED to. Dare I suggest that the third of the kids entered for GCSE science at Chase were the only ones who WANTED to do it? stopmoaning1
  • Score: 6

5:04pm Mon 27 Jan 14

jolllyboy says...

Mixed ability does not work. It may well bring the less academic up but their skills usually lay elsewhere and good for them, but mixing holds those back that are more academic. For goodness sake this country is way behind others in expertise at a high level. We need schools like the grammars but bring back the Technical Colleges too.
Mixed ability does not work. It may well bring the less academic up but their skills usually lay elsewhere and good for them, but mixing holds those back that are more academic. For goodness sake this country is way behind others in expertise at a high level. We need schools like the grammars but bring back the Technical Colleges too. jolllyboy
  • Score: 6

8:59pm Mon 27 Jan 14

jayman says...

http://www.education
.gov.uk/cgi-bin/scho
ols/perform ance/group.pl?qtype=
LA&superview=sec&vie
w=cqs&set=1&tab=33&n
o=882&sort=census_13
.numfsmever&ord=desc


the rose, surrounded by thorns.

i was waiting for the echo to be responsible in its reporting and highlight the fact that our state secondary schools are languishing in the lowest national measure for schools of similar size.

http://www.education
.gov.uk/cgi-bin/scho
ols/performance/grou
p.pl?qtype=SSC&tab=5
12&ord=desc&sort=ks4
_13.ptac5em&set=20&n
o=131146&superview=s
ec&sscla=882

alas, the local Tories are complacently happy with the outcome.
http://www.education .gov.uk/cgi-bin/scho ols/perform ance/group.pl?qtype= LA&superview=sec&vie w=cqs&set=1&tab=33&n o=882&sort=census_13 .numfsmever&ord=desc the rose, surrounded by thorns. i was waiting for the echo to be responsible in its reporting and highlight the fact that our state secondary schools are languishing in the lowest national measure for schools of similar size. http://www.education .gov.uk/cgi-bin/scho ols/performance/grou p.pl?qtype=SSC&tab=5 12&ord=desc&sort=ks4 _13.ptac5em&set=20&n o=131146&superview=s ec&sscla=882 alas, the local Tories are complacently happy with the outcome. jayman
  • Score: -4

9:02pm Mon 27 Jan 14

jayman says...

oh here's another bit of 'doing the echo's job' I really should be a journalist

http://www.education
.gov.uk/cgi-bin/scho
ols/performance/grou
p.pl?qtype=SSC&tab=5
12&ord=desc&sort=ks4
_13.ptac5em&set=20&n
o=115368&superview=s
ec&sscla=882
oh here's another bit of 'doing the echo's job' I really should be a journalist http://www.education .gov.uk/cgi-bin/scho ols/performance/grou p.pl?qtype=SSC&tab=5 12&ord=desc&sort=ks4 _13.ptac5em&set=20&n o=115368&superview=s ec&sscla=882 jayman
  • Score: -6

10:05pm Mon 27 Jan 14

jayman says...

jolllyboy wrote:
Mixed ability does not work. It may well bring the less academic up but their skills usually lay elsewhere and good for them, but mixing holds those back that are more academic. For goodness sake this country is way behind others in expertise at a high level. We need schools like the grammars but bring back the Technical Colleges too.
I don't think its about mixed ability. I think its more about mixed methods. This is what affects educational outcomes.

The UK education system has no single unifying structure any-more. Even grammar schools where supposed to be part of a Tripartite system. Grammar school is the only fragment left of this system that was supposed to support an entire spectrum of educational ability. Unfortunately the 1944 educational act relied on the oak-panelled institutions with the house captains and perfects emulating the trappings of the tuition fee charging counterparts.

the 'Secondary Technical Schools' where not built in any great number. This was due to a general disquiet amongst middle class representatives of the day who provided fine reasons against there construction. It is recognised today that these schools or the ethos behind them would have made the job market more competitive with increasing numbers of working class children with good grades applying for good jobs. middle class protectionists kicked the whole concept off the playing field and went about the business of making 'grammar schools' as unrecognisable to the working classes as passable (though in theory they are state funded) and reducing the employer/higher educational capital and value of a non-selective education.

unfortunately we have a militant middle class in this country who will kick the ladder from under any child from a poor background that attempts to climb or who shows a gift or a talent that this country desperately needs right now.
[quote][p][bold]jolllyboy[/bold] wrote: Mixed ability does not work. It may well bring the less academic up but their skills usually lay elsewhere and good for them, but mixing holds those back that are more academic. For goodness sake this country is way behind others in expertise at a high level. We need schools like the grammars but bring back the Technical Colleges too.[/p][/quote]I don't think its about mixed ability. I think its more about mixed methods. This is what affects educational outcomes. The UK education system has no single unifying structure any-more. Even grammar schools where supposed to be part of a Tripartite system. Grammar school is the only fragment left of this system that was supposed to support an entire spectrum of educational ability. Unfortunately the 1944 educational act relied on the oak-panelled institutions with the house captains and perfects emulating the trappings of the tuition fee charging counterparts. the 'Secondary Technical Schools' where not built in any great number. This was due to a general disquiet amongst middle class representatives of the day who provided fine reasons against there construction. It is recognised today that these schools or the ethos behind them would have made the job market more competitive with increasing numbers of working class children with good grades applying for good jobs. middle class protectionists kicked the whole concept off the playing field and went about the business of making 'grammar schools' as unrecognisable to the working classes as passable (though in theory they are state funded) and reducing the employer/higher educational capital and value of a non-selective education. unfortunately we have a militant middle class in this country who will kick the ladder from under any child from a poor background that attempts to climb or who shows a gift or a talent that this country desperately needs right now. jayman
  • Score: -1

4:25pm Tue 28 Jan 14

PippinLayla says...

There is one word for all the miserable negative posters writing rubbish about such a brilliant school..."jealous". You should be proud of what schools in your local area do. I am proud of all of the grammar schools in Essex that make people realise that the county isn't actually like how its represented on TOWIE. I am proud of the fact we have more of the top ten schools for GCSE and A level in our county than ANY OTHER COUNTY.
There is one word for all the miserable negative posters writing rubbish about such a brilliant school..."jealous". You should be proud of what schools in your local area do. I am proud of all of the grammar schools in Essex that make people realise that the county isn't actually like how its represented on TOWIE. I am proud of the fact we have more of the top ten schools for GCSE and A level in our county than ANY OTHER COUNTY. PippinLayla
  • Score: 9

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