Arctic hero James gets his medal 70 years on

Southend Standard: Arctic hero James gets his medal 70 years on Arctic hero James gets his medal 70 years on

A WAR veteran aged 93 has finally been recognised for his service 70 years on.

James Lovett, who lives with his wife Jessie, 87, in Rochford, picked up the Arctic Star medal from James Duddridge, Conservative MP for Rochford and Southend East.

Mr Lovett, who joined the Navy at 19, served on Arctic convoy during the Second World War which delivered four million tonnes of cargo and munitions to the Soviet Union.

However, the voyages cost the lives of 3,000 seamen from the UK – the highest fatality rate of any maritime campaign in the war.

Mr Lovett’s children, daughters Elaine Mitchell, 65, Linda Strang, 66, and son, Danny, aged 57, applied for the medal on his behalf after Prime Minister David Cameron said medals should be awarded to Arctic veterans earlier this year.

Elaine said: “He was very surpised to recieve the medal, but he was absolutely thrilled. Memories of that time are often the most vivid for him. At the time it was an adventure, and was the only opportunity for foeign travel.

“Many people think it was a horrible time – and the conditions were certainly awful – but he talks of it with pride. We’re all so proud of him.”

The medal arrived in a padded bag in the post, so Elaine arranged for it to be presented by Mr Duddridge.

The MP said: “It was a great honour to be allowed to present an award to someone who has served our country in such a commendable way.

“If it wasn’t for the bravery of the men involved in the Arctic Convoy, the Second World War may well have had a different ending, and all our lives would be materially different.

Comments (7)

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8:39am Fri 27 Dec 13

bob7 says...

At last!
Thank you for your service Mr Lovett.
At last! Thank you for your service Mr Lovett. bob7

11:48am Fri 27 Dec 13

Howard Cháse says...

Hear hear!
Hear hear! Howard Cháse

2:55pm Fri 27 Dec 13

Cockle says...

Recognition at last for some very brave men.
Well deserved, Mr Lovett, I salute you, sir.

But to send the medals out by post in a padded envelope shows, to me, that the recognition is begrudgingly bestowed. A recognition that is sadly too late for far too many of the brave men who undertook the Arctic convoys, my uncle amongst them, who have passed away having never been honoured for their brave contribution to the war effort.

Make no mistake, these men undertook some of the most hazardous journeys made by the Merchant Navy in some appalling conditions that we can only imagine. To have to abandon ship in those waters meant almost certain death within minutes but many returned time and time again to do their duty. Brave men all.
Recognition at last for some very brave men. Well deserved, Mr Lovett, I salute you, sir. But to send the medals out by post in a padded envelope shows, to me, that the recognition is begrudgingly bestowed. A recognition that is sadly too late for far too many of the brave men who undertook the Arctic convoys, my uncle amongst them, who have passed away having never been honoured for their brave contribution to the war effort. Make no mistake, these men undertook some of the most hazardous journeys made by the Merchant Navy in some appalling conditions that we can only imagine. To have to abandon ship in those waters meant almost certain death within minutes but many returned time and time again to do their duty. Brave men all. Cockle

5:14pm Fri 27 Dec 13

Howard Cháse says...

Cockle wrote:
Recognition at last for some very brave men.
Well deserved, Mr Lovett, I salute you, sir.

But to send the medals out by post in a padded envelope shows, to me, that the recognition is begrudgingly bestowed. A recognition that is sadly too late for far too many of the brave men who undertook the Arctic convoys, my uncle amongst them, who have passed away having never been honoured for their brave contribution to the war effort.

Make no mistake, these men undertook some of the most hazardous journeys made by the Merchant Navy in some appalling conditions that we can only imagine. To have to abandon ship in those waters meant almost certain death within minutes but many returned time and time again to do their duty. Brave men all.
Well said.

Top blokes the lot of them.
[quote][p][bold]Cockle[/bold] wrote: Recognition at last for some very brave men. Well deserved, Mr Lovett, I salute you, sir. But to send the medals out by post in a padded envelope shows, to me, that the recognition is begrudgingly bestowed. A recognition that is sadly too late for far too many of the brave men who undertook the Arctic convoys, my uncle amongst them, who have passed away having never been honoured for their brave contribution to the war effort. Make no mistake, these men undertook some of the most hazardous journeys made by the Merchant Navy in some appalling conditions that we can only imagine. To have to abandon ship in those waters meant almost certain death within minutes but many returned time and time again to do their duty. Brave men all.[/p][/quote]Well said. Top blokes the lot of them. Howard Cháse

7:30pm Fri 27 Dec 13

InTheKnowOk says...

I like these stories, pity there aren't more of them ..
I like these stories, pity there aren't more of them .. InTheKnowOk

2:42pm Sat 28 Dec 13

Cockle says...

Timely enough.

If anyone is interested there is a documentary on BBC2 at 21:00 on Thursday Jan 2 about the disaster of PQ17. Love him, or hate him, Jeremy Clarkson is doing the documentary but from the trailer it gives a pretty good indication of the conditions these convoys went through.

From the BBC website:-

Jeremy Clarkson tells the dramatic story of the Arctic convoys of the Second World War, from Russia to the freezing Arctic Ocean.

Accompanied by moving first hand testimony from the men who served on these convoys, Clarkson reveals the incredible hazards faced by members of the Merchant and Royal Navy who delivered vital war supplies via the Arctic to the Soviet Union: temperatures of minus 50 degrees, huge icebergs, colossal waves, not to mention German U-boats and the Luftwaffe. It is no wonder that Churchill described the Arctic Convoys as 'the worst journey in the world.'

Between 1941 and 1945, more than 70 convoys delivered 4 million tonnes of material to the USSR, yet one convoy in partiuclar would come to symbolise the dangers faced by the men who served on them. Codenamed PQ17, this convoy of 35 merchant ships would be described by Churchill as one of the most melancholy naval episodes of the war.

Retracing the route of PQ17 from the Arctic to the Russian winter port of Archangel, Clarkson reveals how, on the night of July 4th 1942, this joint Anglo-American convoy became one of the biggest naval disasters of the 20th century. To make matters worse, the cause of the disaster lay not in the brutal conditions of the Arctic, or the military might of the Germans, but a misjudgement made in the corridors of the Admiralty in London.
Timely enough. If anyone is interested there is a documentary on BBC2 at 21:00 on Thursday Jan 2 about the disaster of PQ17. Love him, or hate him, Jeremy Clarkson is doing the documentary but from the trailer it gives a pretty good indication of the conditions these convoys went through. From the BBC website:- Jeremy Clarkson tells the dramatic story of the Arctic convoys of the Second World War, from Russia to the freezing Arctic Ocean. Accompanied by moving first hand testimony from the men who served on these convoys, Clarkson reveals the incredible hazards faced by members of the Merchant and Royal Navy who delivered vital war supplies via the Arctic to the Soviet Union: temperatures of minus 50 degrees, huge icebergs, colossal waves, not to mention German U-boats and the Luftwaffe. It is no wonder that Churchill described the Arctic Convoys as 'the worst journey in the world.' Between 1941 and 1945, more than 70 convoys delivered 4 million tonnes of material to the USSR, yet one convoy in partiuclar would come to symbolise the dangers faced by the men who served on them. Codenamed PQ17, this convoy of 35 merchant ships would be described by Churchill as one of the most melancholy naval episodes of the war. Retracing the route of PQ17 from the Arctic to the Russian winter port of Archangel, Clarkson reveals how, on the night of July 4th 1942, this joint Anglo-American convoy became one of the biggest naval disasters of the 20th century. To make matters worse, the cause of the disaster lay not in the brutal conditions of the Arctic, or the military might of the Germans, but a misjudgement made in the corridors of the Admiralty in London. Cockle

2:59am Thu 2 Jan 14

Kim Gandy says...

Thanks Cockle.. I shall be watching that...

James Lovett is a fine example of somebody whose boots many of today's obnoxious little scrotes who roam the streets are not fit to lick.

He and his ilk are the ones we owe it to big time.

What a pity that the efforts of this fine man and millions of others like him, have been totally trashed by successive governments, the EU and the crackpot lefties that support their vile, self hating regimes.
Thanks Cockle.. I shall be watching that... James Lovett is a fine example of somebody whose boots many of today's obnoxious little scrotes who roam the streets are not fit to lick. He and his ilk are the ones we owe it to big time. What a pity that the efforts of this fine man and millions of others like him, have been totally trashed by successive governments, the EU and the crackpot lefties that support their vile, self hating regimes. Kim Gandy

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