Number of people convicted of animal cruelty has doubled

Southend Standard: Number of people convicted of animal cruelty has doubled Number of people convicted of animal cruelty has doubled

THE number of animal cruelty convictions in Essex has doubled.

Figures released by the RSPCA show there were 144 convictions last year compared to 71 the year before. Nationally, the figure dropped from 1,552 to 1,371.

Paul Stilgoe, RSPCA superintendent, said: “It is really difficult to say what drives people to act in such utterly pointless cruel ways, and neglect their animals to such an extent.

“In some cases, people just don’t knowwhat an animal needs or financial circumstances can lead to difficulties, while others find organised cruelty, or deliberate violence towards an animal acceptable.

“We will always try to work with people and re-educate where possible, but there will always be some people who think it is alright to beat, kick, kill, starve or neglect an animal and times when the only way to stop them is to prosecute.”

The figures are detailed in the charity’s Prosecutions Annual Report.

It also revealed the RSPCA received a record 1.3million calls to its national cruelty line last year.

To report incidents of animal cruelty, call 0300 1234 999.

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2:53pm Wed 18 Jun 14

emcee says...

The RSPCA make their money by prosecuting people. Every successful prosecution is a magnet for thousands upon thousands of donations from their supporters. They will prosecute for even the tiniest thing and usually target the most vunerable (these are easiest to prosecute).

As the RSPCA have no official powers they can only carry out private prosecutions. To do this they also need to obtain evidence privately. To obtain this evidence they need to gather verbal information/confessi
ons and/or enter the property on which the alleged offence is taking place. They have NO POWERS to do either.
There are laws already in place to alow the proper authorities to investigate and prosecute for animal cruelty through the Crown Prosecution Service. However, the police and the justice system are increasingly helping the RSPCA, a mere charitable organisation with no official powers and no authority in law to carry out investigations, do all the work for them. Why? Because it is easier and cheaper to allow a very rich (and the RSPCA are, indeed, rich) charity go to all the trouble and expense.

All you have to remember when dealing with the RSPCA is:

1. Never give them your name or any personal details. In fact, do not speak to them at all. You do not have to.

2. NEVER, EVER, ALLOW THEM TO ENTER YOUR PROPERTY. You do not have to allow them access.

3. If you do speak to them make sure it is only to ask them to go away and to "remove their implied right of access" (this is a legal term to stop them ever to set foot on your property again).

If everybody followed these simple rules, regardless of how much they will try to intimidate (and they will try very hard) the amount of RSPCA prosecutions would fall considerably.

The RSPCA are in the business to make money first and consider welfare of animals a poor second. In fact the welfare of animals is a mere tool towards their political and financial aims. People need to wake up to their real agendas.

Interesting site:
http://the-shg.org/
The RSPCA make their money by prosecuting people. Every successful prosecution is a magnet for thousands upon thousands of donations from their supporters. They will prosecute for even the tiniest thing and usually target the most vunerable (these are easiest to prosecute). As the RSPCA have no official powers they can only carry out private prosecutions. To do this they also need to obtain evidence privately. To obtain this evidence they need to gather verbal information/confessi ons and/or enter the property on which the alleged offence is taking place. They have NO POWERS to do either. There are laws already in place to alow the proper authorities to investigate and prosecute for animal cruelty through the Crown Prosecution Service. However, the police and the justice system are increasingly helping the RSPCA, a mere charitable organisation with no official powers and no authority in law to carry out investigations, do all the work for them. Why? Because it is easier and cheaper to allow a very rich (and the RSPCA are, indeed, rich) charity go to all the trouble and expense. All you have to remember when dealing with the RSPCA is: 1. Never give them your name or any personal details. In fact, do not speak to them at all. You do not have to. 2. NEVER, EVER, ALLOW THEM TO ENTER YOUR PROPERTY. You do not have to allow them access. 3. If you do speak to them make sure it is only to ask them to go away and to "remove their implied right of access" (this is a legal term to stop them ever to set foot on your property again). If everybody followed these simple rules, regardless of how much they will try to intimidate (and they will try very hard) the amount of RSPCA prosecutions would fall considerably. The RSPCA are in the business to make money first and consider welfare of animals a poor second. In fact the welfare of animals is a mere tool towards their political and financial aims. People need to wake up to their real agendas. Interesting site: http://the-shg.org/ emcee
  • Score: 6

4:25pm Wed 18 Jun 14

LexyGirl says...

What about all the animals that have bleach put in their eyes and other chemicals injected in their brain, what about the animals that are tortured and dissected without anesthesia, that's cruelty too but it's called animal testing, most of which is not necessary.
What about all the animals that have bleach put in their eyes and other chemicals injected in their brain, what about the animals that are tortured and dissected without anesthesia, that's cruelty too but it's called animal testing, most of which is not necessary. LexyGirl
  • Score: 0

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