Hovercraft races to save heart attack victim in dramatic rescue

Southend Standard: The hovercraft The hovercraft

A RNLI hovercraft crew joined paramedics to rescue a sailor thought to have suffered a heart attack aboard his boat.

Southend lifeboat was called to help paramedics get the man, in his sixties, off his vessel and across the mud in Smallgains Creek, Canvey, on Friday night.

The paramedics – one of them a lifeboat volunteer in his spare time – tried to stabilise the man’s condition but decided they needed help to get him ashore.

With insufficient water at the rescue site for a lifeboat, the RNLI launched its search and rescue inshore hovercraft, which managed to get within 10ft of the vessel.

The crew then laid down mud mats to make their way to the boat with a stretcher. The man was taken aboard the hovercraft and ferried about 100 yards to a waiting ambulance on the Island Yacht Club slipway.

Hovercraft pilot Saxon Cronin-Garrod said “This was a good example of the emergency services working together in a situation where it was difficult to recover the casualty ashore.

“If it were not for the hovercraft at Southend, a helicopter might have been required.”

Comments (2)

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11:08am Fri 25 Apr 14

My Britain says...

Well done lads!! Life savers Forshaw.
Well done lads!! Life savers Forshaw. My Britain
  • Score: 8

11:55am Sat 26 Apr 14

robinpaine says...

Your readers may be interested in a 700 page book with 450 pictures and a foreword by the The Duke of Edingburgh, also available on Kindle, called 'On a Cushion of Air', (www.Amazon.com or www.thebookdepositor
y.com), which tells the story of the development of the hovercraft by those who were there, from the very early days through to the heyday of the giant 165-ton SRN.4, which crossed the English Channel starting in 1968 carry 30 cars and 254 passengers at speeds in excess of 75 knots on a calm day. It was subsequently widened to carry 36 cars and 280 passengers with an A.U.W. of 200 tons and was later lengthened to an A.U.W of 325 tons and capable of carrying 55 cars and 424 passengers. The amazing point was that from 165 tons to 325 tons only 400 extra hp was required, although a bit of speed was sacrificed.
Sadly, for economic reasons, the service came to an end on 1st October 2000. In total 6 SR.4s were built and the two remaining ones are in the Hovercraft Museum at Lee-on-Solent. See www.onacushionofair.
com
Your readers may be interested in a 700 page book with 450 pictures and a foreword by the The Duke of Edingburgh, also available on Kindle, called 'On a Cushion of Air', (www.Amazon.com or www.thebookdepositor y.com), which tells the story of the development of the hovercraft by those who were there, from the very early days through to the heyday of the giant 165-ton SRN.4, which crossed the English Channel starting in 1968 carry 30 cars and 254 passengers at speeds in excess of 75 knots on a calm day. It was subsequently widened to carry 36 cars and 280 passengers with an A.U.W. of 200 tons and was later lengthened to an A.U.W of 325 tons and capable of carrying 55 cars and 424 passengers. The amazing point was that from 165 tons to 325 tons only 400 extra hp was required, although a bit of speed was sacrificed. Sadly, for economic reasons, the service came to an end on 1st October 2000. In total 6 SR.4s were built and the two remaining ones are in the Hovercraft Museum at Lee-on-Solent. See www.onacushionofair. com robinpaine
  • Score: 0

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